To Hyphen, or Not to Hyphen…

I’ve been working on a cover letter for my first novel, more out of practice than anything else, but it encouraged me to revisit a question I never found an answer for. That is: Do I use a hyphen in the title, or not? Should I write ‘God Chosen’ or ‘God-Chosen’? Well I did a bit of research and found that since it’s not in a sentence, it doesn’t matter. I’ll explain below.

To Hyphen

If I were to use my novel’s title in a sentence, I could say something like “The God-chosen child.” and I would require a hyphen. This is because the description “God-chosen” comes before the noun, “child.”

Not to Hyphen

Conversely, if I were to *cringe* use passive voice *gasp!* and say “The child was God chosen.” I would not use a hyphen since, you guessed it, the description comes after the noun.


Now there are many other uses of hyphens, which I’ll not ramble about. Instead, I highly suggest you check out the Perdue Online Writing Lab on Hyphen Use. It’s very clear on every way you would ever need to use a hyphen. I don’t suggest the Wikipedia article on it unless you want a ton of convoluted and unnecessary information on hyphens, hyphenation, and dashes, which are apparently different from hyphens. Hush Wikipedia, it’s a line.

Hyphen, courtesy mathmlcentral.com

All hail the mighty Hyphen!

The more I type ‘hyphen’ the more I realize what a strange word it is. Hi, Fen!

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About Squishy

Writer, dancer, gamer, and admirer of all that is beautiful.

Posted on August 26, 2010, in Ishy Writes! and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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